AMY BASS

Amy Bass is a professor of history at The College of New Rochelle, where she also serves as the director of the Honors Program. She is a regular contributor to Slate and CNN Opinion. She is a veteran of eight Olympics as the supervisor of NBC’s Research Room, for which she won an Emmy in 2012. Amy is author of “Not the Triumph But the Struggle”: The 1968 Olympics and the Making of the Black Athlete. You can follow her on Twitter at @bassab1

Posts by Amy Bass

Was 2015 Really the ‘Year of Women in Sports’?
Was 2015 Really the ‘Year of Women in Sports’?
According to many year-end commentaries, 2015 was a year when women stood out in sports. Four sports scholars – from the US, Canada, and the UK – discuss the accomplishments and advances of the past year as well as the persistent barriers that remain for women in sport.
Women Who Write About Sports, and the Men Who Hate Them
Women Who Write About Sports, and the Men Who Hate Them
As Ashley Judd learned after tweeting her support of the Kentucky basketball team, women who dare express an opinion about sports will find the Internet to be a hostile place. Sports historian Amy Bass knows this all too well.
Tribute to a Scholar
Tribute to a Scholar
Mike Marqusee passed away on January 13, after a distinguished career of writing about cricket and boxing as well as Renaissance art, Indian culture, Bob Dylan, and Zionism. Although eclectic, his body of work earned the respect of specialists.
Calling Nature a Cheat
Calling Nature a Cheat
Every elite athlete is a genetic anomaly. We don't say that an Usain Bolt or Michael Phelps should be excluded because of their extraordinary physical makeup. Why then are women athletes banned for their natural advantages?
When Sports Go Bad, How Can Fans Be Good?
When Sports Go Bad, How Can Fans Be Good?
Does putting on our team's shirt mean that we cover up our sense of right and wrong? With the NFL engulfed in scandal over players' off-field offenses and wavering leadership by league officials, four of our writers discuss the line between fan loyalty and individual morality.
SPORTOLOGICALLY SPEAKING
During their 1934 tour of Japan, an all-star baseball team featuring Babe Ruth was scheduled to play a game at Hakodate, on the island of Hokkaido. But with steady rain falling before the game and the Americans on a tight schedule, it appeared that the fans of Hakodate would lose their chance to see the Babe. So hundreds of people brought pieces of canvas from home to protect the dirt infield. When the rain passed, the Babe played in Hakodate.
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WOMEN WHO WRITE ABOUT SPORTS, AND THE MEN WHO HATE THEM
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